Mending a Broken … Journal

Now that Prelude is out in the stratosphere, doing it’s own thing, I’ve been concentrating on my next great adventure.

This is a fanciful cover I did a while back for it, even before I began Prelude actually. I used this wonderful software called Pulp-O-mizer, and it creates the most wonderful ‘golden-age’ pulp fiction science fiction covers. It’s not for commercial use but it makes a wonderful placeholder to wrap around my new work until I finish the story and have a clearer idea of what the true cover will look like;

Bel and the Knight Whiskey Runners

-oOo-

I’ve had this ratty old spiral-bound notebook that I use as my writing workbook for, (first entry is dated, 4th March 2010, and still going strong) so, for a long time, and it’s starting to show its age.

I have a few journals going, for all sorts of aspects of my life. They help keep my thoughts organized on the task at hand, otherwise I’d be haring off in a gazillion different directions.

My writing journal is probably the simplest of them all. It’s just an abbreviated list of what writerly things I want to achieve in a day, and whether I’ve managed to achieve them, with a brief note or two if appropriate – hence it’s longevity.

But opening and closing a spiral-bound notebook over three thousand times has a price, and this is the price …

Worn out corners

Worn out corners

I thought it needed a new cover too, so I decided to do a two-fer upgrade.

But how was I supposed to reattach the separatedΒ  bit of the cover inside the spiral to the rest of it and still have it open and close?

First I measured the distance between the spirals. Turns out they’re exactly 8mm apart.

Checking out how it looks BEFORE I glue anything

Checking out how it looks BEFORE I glue anything

I had some business-card-weight sheets of paper stashed away, (we don’t throw away anything in this household!) that I measured up and cut into strips like this ….

Card strip on cutting board - I used a large needle to perforate the mid-point and cut and trimmed each bit where the spirals would go

Card strip on cutting board – I used a large needle to perforate the mid-point and cut and trimmed each bit where the spirals would go

Then, starting on the back cover, I carefully, and very patiently threaded the strip inside the spiral and pulled it in-between each turn of the wire spiral, and glued it in place with some PVA glue, thusly …

Back cover - Shades of dentistry

Back cover – Shades of dentistry

Having practiced on the back cover, I turned my attention to the front …

Front cover - The tricky bit was getting the completely separated bit of cover the old cover to stay in place while I glued it

Front cover – The tricky bit was getting the completely separated bit of cover the old cover to stay in place while I glued it

And here she is, all shiny and refurbished, albeit with well-worn pages within.

Final cover - Ready to go for another nine years

Final cover – Ready to go for another nine years

-oOo-

It seems that this week I’m all about D.I.Y. because I have a post up on my Widds The Shaman blog about making salves.

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33 comments on “Mending a Broken … Journal

  1. […] It seems that this week I’m all about D.I.Y. because I have a post up on my Widds Worlds blog about repairing a journal. […]

    Like

  2. jenanita01 says:

    They say ‘where there’s a will there’s a way…’ and how true that is…
    So clever of you to figure out a way to rescue your old favourite. I will remember this, in case I ever need to do it!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. This is great, and thanks for the Pulp-O-Mizer link. It looks awesome!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thank you Widds for the tip-off regarding Pulp-O-mizer.
    I’ve had a play with it just now and it’s a lot of retro fun. If you see one of its creations turn up anytime soon on SCENIC WRITER’S SHACK this is me thanking you ahead of time.

    Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Impressive repair work

    Liked by 1 person

  6. That is quite a feat, reinforcing your journal. Meticulous work – you must love it.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Donnalee says:

    Good for you–you must be at least my age to never throw anything potentially useful out, and to actually have hand-written notebooks and journals. I’m glad the repair worked.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Widdershins says:

      Vintage 1958. πŸ˜€ … I tried creating digital ones, but I do all my computer-ing on a desktop, at my desk, so if I wanted to write down some thoughts while I was elsewhere, I was out of luck. I have notebooks everywhere too, but I’d end up transcribing what I wrote in them anyway, so I just cut out the middle … erm … note-taking! πŸ˜€

      Liked by 1 person

      • Donnalee says:

        I’m a few years younger, although I am completely firm in feeling about early 30s in age somehow. I am writing a book on tarot from the perspective of having been dead three times and having lots of friends who are old-fashioned multiple personality folks/those with DID, and the book right now is a stack of notes on huge index cards about the size of a notebook, and very little is in the computer as yet–it’s just not as fun somehow!

        Liked by 2 people

        • Widdershins says:

          Heh, nope, the creative bit is where all the juice goes, but there’s something to be said for a good edit. I know when I transfer something from paper to computer I find myself in creative mode anyway. πŸ™‚ … good luck with the book. It sounds like a good ‘un. πŸ™‚

          Like

  8. Olga Godim says:

    Wow – you are such a handy-woman.
    And I truly love the ‘pulp’ cover. I must check out their software.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Wow, well done and how creative. I am way too lazy to do something like that. Lol. Happy Writing!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Cool project and amazing artwork! Love it! I didn’t know about this second blog, so thanks for sharing! 😎

    Liked by 1 person

  11. bone&silver says:

    You’ve got waaaaaay more patience than me, good on you! Admirable πŸ˜ƒ

    Liked by 1 person

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